How to Plan a Consistent Visual Content Strategy | Video Tutorial

A consistent visual content strategy will help your target audience to have a consistent brand experience along their personal user journey on any channel or device. Planning your visual content strategy must go beyond the initial creation of content. You must consider how your content will be managed, governed, analyzed, and maintained as the technology can channels continue to evolve.

In this video from Content Marketing World 2018, I talk about how brand teams can plan a more effective and scalable content strategy that includes a strong visual content strategy.

 

Too often, brands start developing creative designs and channels without really planning how users will actually discover and interact with content resources on multiple channels, including social media. Continue reading

JAWing With JK: Part 2 of a Blog Series on Visual Storytelling

Joe Kalinowski JAWS headerPart 2 of 2: Check out Part 1 “Movie Poster Creates JAWS-Dropping Visual Storytelling Lessons” on the Content Marketing Institute website

Movie Poster Creates JAWS-Dropping Visual Storytelling Lessons

CMI’s Jos Kalinowski on the History of the Jaws Movie Poster
Questions by Buddy Scalera. Answers by Joe Kalinowski,Creative Director at Content Marketing Institute

BUDDY:  The iconic JAWS movie poster was not the first version, right? What were some of the other versions?

JOE K: The original hard cover was black and white painted by artist Paul Bacon for Bantam Books. It was a more simplistic version of the iconic image featuring a white translucent shark veering up towards a swimmer painted in the same style. The shark had no eyes or teeth, just the recognizable shape of the shark’s head and mouth. When Bantam released the book in paperback, they revisited Bacon’s image. They hired artist Roger Kastel to use Bacon’s hardcover image as a starting point, but they were suggesting Kastel to make the image a bit more realistic and of course menacing. Kastel did such an impressive job that Universal Studios chose to use that image for the iconic movie poster. Continue reading