What You Learn From Blogs, Books, & Conferences


Read this blog and then go to the bookstore and schedule your next marketing conference. In that order.

My advice to marketers at all levels of experience is to immerse yourself in the latest and most in-depth learning that you can find. Blogs are an excellent way to seed your ongoing interest in the latest concepts and strategies. I believe in the power of great blogs and read several posts per week.

Yet, there are ideas and concepts that need longer-form expression. Well-written books will give you the depth of thinking that is required to enhance the strategies that will make your marketing effective. Most blogs can’t provide the explanation and exploration that you will find in a 50,000 word book. Continue reading

A Tale of Two Decks (Slideshare Experiment)

Tale of Two Decks Image

 

This is an experiment on Slideshare. This is…A Tale of Two Decks.

Let’s start at the beginning. Recently, I shared the stage with Michelle Killebrew at the Intelligent Content Conference 2015 in San Francisco. If you didn’t attend the event, you missed our somewhat unorthodox presentation where we told “a story about storytelling.”

Note: All videos from the ICC conference are available online. Watch the video of our Long and Short presentation. This is my Intelligent Content Conference 2015 Recap blog post.

Usually the best way to understand a presentation is, well, to see it presented. Realistically, there are only so many conferences any one person can attend, so a lot of us check out Slideshare for interesting and useful presentations.

We planned to simply upload the deck, but that would lose some meaning, since we can’t be there to offer the voice overs and other descriptions. I’ve uploaded other decks in the past, most of them about healthcare marketing and visual storytelling. The decks are clear during the presentation, but would be a bit vague if you didn’t see it presented in person.

This time we decided to try something different. We maintained one master deck, which we called the Original Version. Other than a few minor edits, the deck was a record of how we presented at ICC. The second was a version with comments and call outs, which we called the Annotated Version. This version included slides that we’d removed for time and added several additional slides to enhance the download experience. More on this later. Continue reading