What You Learn From Blogs, Books, & Conferences


Read this blog and then go to the bookstore and schedule your next marketing conference. In that order.

My advice to marketers at all levels of experience is to immerse yourself in the latest and most in-depth learning that you can find. Blogs are an excellent way to seed your ongoing interest in the latest concepts and strategies. I believe in the power of great blogs and read several posts per week.

Yet, there are ideas and concepts that need longer-form expression. Well-written books will give you the depth of thinking that is required to enhance the strategies that will make your marketing effective. Most blogs can’t provide the explanation and exploration that you will find in a 50,000 word book. Continue reading

4 Easy SEO Tips for WordPress | Video Tutorial

Here are four quick and easy tips to optimize your WordPress blog post for search engine visibility. Coding skills or special technical capabilities are not required for these simple tricks. In less than 10 minutes, you can increase the search engine optimization (SEO) of any WordPress blog post.

This video shows how to optimize fields and images to get the maximum value from your post.

SEO is essential to create discoverable content that your readers can find on Google, Bing, Yahoo, or even Duck Duck Go. SEO can become quite complicated and intimidating for the average user. So here are four easy SEO tips for non-technical people using WordPress for a blog or website. Continue reading

How to Access Twitter Analytics Dashboard for Data on Your Tweets

You may use Twitter every day for work or for fun, but have you ever really looked at the performance of your tweets? Then it’s time you looked at your Twitter Analytics, which are free and easy to access, even if you’ve never looked at analytics ever before.

This video shows you step-by-step how to access your Twitter Analytics dashboard, how to navigate to the important information, and how to understand how your account is performing compared to other Twitter users. Best of all, this data is all free.

Continue reading

3 Types of Behavior Change for Marketers

Types of Behavior Change in Content MarketingThree Type of Behavior Change: Part of the Content Strategy Basics series. 

Behavior change is usually an important component of content marketing strategy. There are many types of behavior change, but you can distill these down to three that matter to brand marketers.

Behavior Change #1: Try my product.
You’re not using my product, so I will give you reasons to try it.
A user may be unaware of your product or may not see it as an option. In traditional funnel terms, this is qualified lead.

The desired change is for them to try the product. This is usually bundled with awareness and/or disruption marketing that is designed to trigger an action. The action may be as simple as visiting a website or initializing a search on Google or Bing, but it is an early stage action that may benefit from activities in public relations, advertising, social media, and other related tactics. Continue reading

How Tigers Influenced Your Visual Processing

What do you see when you look at the picture below?

It’s not really a formal quiz, so I’ll just give you a hint. If you started off by thinking “it’s a grid” then you were correct. You were also correct, if you noted that the grid was comprised of 54 individual blue squares or boxes. You might have noted the rectangular shape of the grid too.

Grid with 54 Blocks

Grid with 54 Blocks

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KPIs & User Journey Metrics for Marketers: Part 3

In the first post of this series on content analytics, I talked about the old way of measuring your marketing content with key performance indicators (KPIs) and why you can’t rely on old measurement models for new media channels. In the second post, I offered an analytics framework for measuring content KPIs along a user-journey continuum.

This leads me to the third post in this three-part series on measurement. In this post, I’m focusing on how you can measure the actions on the page to determine how users are interacting with your content. Or not.

Of course, there’s a rather basic problem here. You want to measure the performance of your content and tools, but most reports are just measuring the page itself. We want to measure the components. Continue reading

KPIs & User Journey Metrics for Marketers: Part 2

One of the more confusing aspects of content strategy is the marketing analytics strategy. There are a lot of ways to measure the performance of your website, but when it comes to content analytics, I offer the following solution. But before we start, you may want to check out Part 1 of this three-part series.

First, consider the fact that website analytics and content analytics may not be the same thing. For example, websites like Amazon are measuring the shopping cart experience and sites like Google are measuring the speed to deliver search engine results. Both of these are valuable metrics for the performance of their sites and may not have as much to do with content as it has to do with the back-end performance and engineering of the website. Continue reading

JAWing With JK: Part 2 of a Blog Series on Visual Storytelling

Joe Kalinowski JAWS headerPart 2 of 2: Check out Part 1 “Movie Poster Creates JAWS-Dropping Visual Storytelling Lessons” on the Content Marketing Institute website

Movie Poster Creates JAWS-Dropping Visual Storytelling Lessons

CMI’s Jos Kalinowski on the History of the Jaws Movie Poster
Questions by Buddy Scalera. Answers by Joe Kalinowski,Creative Director at Content Marketing Institute

BUDDY:  The iconic JAWS movie poster was not the first version, right? What were some of the other versions?

JOE K: The original hard cover was black and white painted by artist Paul Bacon for Bantam Books. It was a more simplistic version of the iconic image featuring a white translucent shark veering up towards a swimmer painted in the same style. The shark had no eyes or teeth, just the recognizable shape of the shark’s head and mouth. When Bantam released the book in paperback, they revisited Bacon’s image. They hired artist Roger Kastel to use Bacon’s hardcover image as a starting point, but they were suggesting Kastel to make the image a bit more realistic and of course menacing. Kastel did such an impressive job that Universal Studios chose to use that image for the iconic movie poster. Continue reading

A Tale of Two Decks (Slideshare Experiment)

Tale of Two Decks Image

 

This is an experiment on Slideshare. This is…A Tale of Two Decks.

Let’s start at the beginning. Recently, I shared the stage with Michelle Killebrew at the Intelligent Content Conference 2015 in San Francisco. If you didn’t attend the event, you missed our somewhat unorthodox presentation where we told “a story about storytelling.”

Note: All videos from the ICC conference are available online. Watch the video of our Long and Short presentation. This is my Intelligent Content Conference 2015 Recap blog post.

Usually the best way to understand a presentation is, well, to see it presented. Realistically, there are only so many conferences any one person can attend, so a lot of us check out Slideshare for interesting and useful presentations.

We planned to simply upload the deck, but that would lose some meaning, since we can’t be there to offer the voice overs and other descriptions. I’ve uploaded other decks in the past, most of them about healthcare marketing and visual storytelling. The decks are clear during the presentation, but would be a bit vague if you didn’t see it presented in person.

This time we decided to try something different. We maintained one master deck, which we called the Original Version. Other than a few minor edits, the deck was a record of how we presented at ICC. The second was a version with comments and call outs, which we called the Annotated Version. This version included slides that we’d removed for time and added several additional slides to enhance the download experience. More on this later. Continue reading